chris_gerrib: (Me 2)
I am the IT director for a midsized, financially stable and growing bank in the Chicago area. I have an opening for an entry-level network support person. We're actively looking, and the official opening is posted here.

We're a small shop (total IT staff, counting me, is four) and I think the pay is competitive for what we're seeking, which is a first-level PC break-fix and installation tech. The job is in Oak Brook, and does involve some driving to other sites in the Chicago area. Mileage is paid, but you need your own wheels. We do various background checks, so if something criminal or credit-related will pop up, I need to know about it up front. We're a Windows shop, running Active Directory. Our mainframe functions are outsourced.

Oh Joy

Jan. 8th, 2015 09:51 am
chris_gerrib: (Me 2)
We had trivia last night and lost, and this AM my emergency generator monitoring system decided to stop communicating. Now, I really like having a remote monitoring solution, but adding a system means adding a problem. I guess that's why they call this work!
chris_gerrib: (Me 2)
Yesterday afternoon was busy at work - we closed a branch and had to be out of the space by the end of the day. It was a small facility, rented and had few customers, so we were able to clear out with minimal hassle (I was the last guy out the door at 6:15) but still, I find myself slightly dragging today.

Secret Service Follies

Unless you've been under a rock, you've heard that some mentally-addled person jumped the White House fence and got into the building. The Usual Suspects are baying about "bad management" in the Secret Service. Here's the real fact - the only way to prevent this from happening is having a red line. Anybody gets past the red line they get sniped from the roof and/or shot from a guard.

Had that happened, had the Secret Service just shot the nut, those same Usual Suspects would be baying about "Imperial Presidency" and "oppression." In short, the Secret Service can't win the PR battle.
chris_gerrib: (Me)
Thing #1

It looks like my Windycon schedule is in flux. More details when I have them.

Thing #2

I have a lot of remote monitoring turned on for my work network. Last night, one of the servers monitored had a millisecond-long hiccup which spit out an alert. If I hadn't had the alerts turned on, I wouldn't have known about it. I did so I did, but it proved to be a non-problem. Sometimes monitoring systems has you chasing ghosts.

Thing #3

I lit off the fireplaces in my house last night. I did this for a couple of reasons, one of which was as an experiment. When I first moved to Chicago, my apartment lost power during a spring snowstorm. I was just about ready to abandon it for a hotel due to lack of heat when the power came back on. Even if you have gas heat (which I did) no power means no heat. So, the first thing I bought when I moved to my first house was a kerosene heater, just in case. So, last night, I tested to see if the gas fireplaces could heat the building. Yes, but not terribly well, is the answer.
chris_gerrib: (Me)
I'm back in the salt mines at work after being gone for two days. I new staffer started (yeah!) but between his arrival and the accumulated workload, my day has been consumed by locusts.
chris_gerrib: (Me)
Two thoughts, related only by being in my head.

Thought The First

The advantage of having remote network monitoring tools is that when your network goes down on a weekend, you can get it fixed before everybody comes back to work on Monday. I for one hate being ambushed by a herd of angry users. The disadvantage of remote network monitoring is that you have to come in on the weekend and try to fix the network.

Thought The Second

As of Friday evening's writing session, I have written 49,131 words in 53 days. That's 927 words per day.
chris_gerrib: (Me)
I don't usually blog about work (trouble be that way) but in my "other duties as assigned" I had to address the perennial issue of space heaters. Incorporated herewith is my email to the staff on the subject.

To: All Bank Employees
Subj: Space Heaters

Ask any fire marshal, and they will tell you they don't like space heaters. They've seen too many fires started by these devices. Having said that, the bank does in fact allow the use of space heaters, although we encourage you to not use them.

If you are going to use a space heater at work, a few thoughts:

1) Get the smallest heater you can. I recommend getting a small ceramic heater. These are the least likely to overheat. Don't bring in some old metal clunker you bought at a garage sale for a buck. We're a bank, not "Antiques Roadshow."

2) Check out the heater periodically. If the wires are frayed or the unit is otherwise damaged, get a new unit. Burning down the building because you wanted to save twenty bucks isn't a good idea.

3) Be careful where your unit is pointing. Electronics, like computers, don't like heat, and we've already cooked a computer hard drive into failure by having a space heater blow on it.

4) Turn off the heater when you are not using it, including when you go to lunch or a meeting.

In short, please use common sense and be safe.
chris_gerrib: (Default)
Much like John Scalzi, I have no desire whatsoever to go shopping today. Since Mom is still laid up with her hip (although they are moving her to a rehab place today, so improvements noted) I decided to go into work.

Speaking of work, it looks like (fingers crossed) we've filled our recent job opening. It's nice to be in a position to hire, especially in a soft economy.

Yesterday, in lieu of an after-Thanksgiving-meal nap, I decided to take in the new movie Lincoln. Although obviously set during the Civil War, it's not an action movie, instead focusing on the passing of the 13th Amendment banning slavery. The movie then cuts to the Hampton Roads Conference, a meeting held the week after the amendment passed in which the Confederates asked for peace. The movie makes clear that the reason the conference failed was Southern insistence on slavery. What it doesn't show is that Lincoln, at the conference, offered to give the South cash in compensation for freed slaves. I found the movie both historically accurate and very entertaining.
chris_gerrib: (Default)
I don't usually post about work, but this is a good exception. I am the IT director for a small and financially stable bank in the Chicago area. One of my network admins just handed in his resignation. Our HR Department hasn't officially posted an opening, but the chances of finding an inside candidate are pretty slim, so consider this an advance notice.

We're a small shop (total IT staff, counting me, is four) and I think the pay is competitive for what we're seeking, which is a first-level PC break-fix and installation tech. The job is in Oak Brook, and does involve some driving to other sites in the Chicago area. Mileage is paid, but you need your own wheels. We do various background checks, so if something criminal or credit-related will pop up, I need to know about it up front. We're a Windows shop, running Active Directory. Our mainframe functions are outsourced.

Email cgerrib at comcast dot net for more details.
chris_gerrib: (Default)
My parents are in town, and one of my staffers is leaving (last day is today), so I've been too busy to blog. Since tomorrow I will be at 50% staffing (due to departures and vacations), don't expect much then either.

BTW, my bank is still hiring - please feel free to cross-post to anywhere you can think of.
chris_gerrib: (Default)
My US readers will be familiar with the Comcast commercial in which the rich guy with the cheesy Eastern European accent says, "Opulence. I has it."

Well, "gout, I has it." I've had high uric acid for a couple of years, and this morning my knee gave me a painful wake-up call at oh-four-ayem. Fortunately, this particular flare-up responded well to plain-old aspirin, so we're doing that for now. In a week or so, and pending the arrival of a confirmatory blood test, the doc will put me on allopurinol.

In other news, one of my key IT staffers quit. (Considering that I am one-fourth of the department, they're all key staffers.) He's going off to Iraq to be a defense contractor at three times what I'm paying him. So, if you know a PC network person looking for a job in Chicago, have them contact me.

Lastly, my Rotary club marches in the Darien 4th of July parade. This year, our vehicle wouldn't start on the morning of the parade, so we didn't march.

It has been a less-than-good day or so.
chris_gerrib: (Default)
Three random thoughts with promise of a fourth later.

Random Thought #1

I'm a big fan of Cherie Priest ([livejournal.com profile] cmpriest), and so I ordered her newest novel Bloodshot. I finished reading it over the weekend, and I found it quite enjoyable. It's a modern urban fantasy, and other than having a Seattle-based protagonist, it has nothing to do with her "Clockwork Century" series of books. Still, it's a good read.

Random Thought #2

I tend to have dinners at a local restaurant here in Villa Park. Well, over the weekend, a goose took up residence in a planter by their front door. Besides the mess (goose shit like, well, geese) the bird has laid eggs and become very territorial. So, I provided the restaurant management a tip: call these folks to evict the goose.

Random Thought #3

I am on the advisory panel for the College of DuPage's CIT (Computer Information Technology) program. This is a program heavily into training folks as network administrators - routers, switches and VoIP stuff. They need some adjunct faculty to teach courses. It's a part-time gig; 64 class hours for around $3,000. If anybody in Chicago is looking, email me at cgerrib (at) comcast (dot) net.

Random Thought #3.5

I've been a supporter of the Central Asia Institute, the "Stones into Schools" people. Per 60 Minutes, their finances are, well, suspect. I'm trying to gather my thoughts on the subject into a coherent post, which I'll upload soon.
chris_gerrib: (Default)
I don't usually post about work, but I'm getting a bit desperate. I am the IT director for a small and financially stable bank in the Chicago area. One of my network admins is looking to move back to Texas, and I am desperately trying to replace him before he goes.

We're a small shop (total staff, counting me, is three) and I think the pay is competitive. I've made four offers to various people, but haven't been able to seal the deal. I keep hearing the economy is weak, but damned if I see that in the job market. So, if you're interested, email me at cgerrib at comcast dot net. Some key points:

1) The job is in Oak Brook, and does involve some driving to other sites in the Chicago area. Mileage is paid, but you need your own wheels.

2) We do various background checks, so if something criminal or credit-related will pop up, I need to know about it up front.

3) We're a Windows shop, running Active Directory. Our mainframe functions are outsourced.

Email cgerrib at comcast dot net for more details.

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